Photos & Videos » Galleries » Eagle Ford Shale

Justin Littles, of Cuero, carries a ladder as he works on the construction of Troubadours Dancehall and Saloon at the site of an old hardware store at 144 E. Main St. in Cuero. James Bricker, co-owner of the business, said the Eagle Ford Shale production and resulting boom in the area were significant factors in his decision to bring a business to the area. "There's really not anything like this in Cuero," he said.

Published on October 29, 2011

Michael Thamm, of Thamm Plumbing in Cuero, peers into a box of supplies as he works on the renovation of an old hardware store at 144 E. Main Street in Cuero to transform it into Troubadours dance hall and saloon. The business coming to Cuero is a result of the boom caused by the Eagle Ford shale drilling in the area, says co-owner James Bricker.

Published on October 29, 2011

Cattle graze alongside storage tanks on a drilling pad on McCurdy Road in Cuero. DeWitt County, one of Texas' top producers of cattle, saw 125 applications to drill oil wells in 2010, 102 of which were for horizontal drilling, used for production of the Eagle Ford Shale, said Daryl Fowler, DeWitt County judge.

Published on October 29, 2011

An oil tanker rolls down U.S. Highway 87 toward Cuero. The recent boom in the area caused by drilling in the Eagle Ford Shale can be seen in the rig traffic traveling through town 24 hours a day. "I remember, as a little girl, (my grandfather) saying, 'the oil is here, they just need to come and get it,'" DeWitt County District Clerk Tabeth Gardner said about the Eagle Ford Shale drilling in Cuero.

Published on October 29, 2011

"Cuero will never be a sleepy little town ever again," Cuero Sheriff Jode Zavesky says of the Eagle Ford Shale drilling. Zavesky and his wife, Gina, are working to open Ruby's Diner, a restaurant in the American Legion Hall in Cuero. The couple have dreamed of opening a restaurant but sped up their plans based on the recent economic boom.

Published on October 29, 2011

"Cuero will never be a sleepy little town ever again," Cuero Sheriff Jode Zavesky says of the Eagle Ford Shale drilling. Zavesky and his wife, Gina, are working to open Ruby's Diner, a restaurant in the American Legion Hall. The couple have dreamed of opening a restaurant but sped up their plans based on the recent economic boom.

Published on October 29, 2011

Justin Littles, of Cuero, carries a ladder as he works on the construction of Troubadours dance hall and saloon at the site of an old hardware store at 144 E. Main St. James Bricker, co-owner of the business, said the Eagle Ford shale production played heavily in his decision to bring a business to the area. "There's really not anything like this is in Cuero," he says.

Published on October 29, 2011

A pipe carrying water to a fracking pond at an Eagle Ford Shale drilling site runs along the side of McCurdy Road in Cuero. Although oil drilling has brought wealth to the area, one of Cuero's oldest industries, cattle, are still evident in fields along the road.

Published on October 29, 2011

Landman Gloria Ganann, of Dripping Springs, left, and Terri Elbel, of Lufkin, research the record books in the basement of the DeWitt County Courthouse in Cuero. The courthouse has been packed with people researching land and mineral rights ownership for oil companies looking to lease land to drill into the Eagle Ford Shale. The demand for land record information has been so high an oil company has entered into an agreement with DeWitt County to keep the courthouse open Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Published on October 29, 2011

James Bricker, of Liberty, talks about his new saloon, Troubadours dance hall and saloon,144 E. Main St. "People have been really nice and supportive and positive about us being an addition to the community," Bricker says about the business, which is expected to open in early November. Bricker said he picked Cuero to open his business because of the boom brought about by the Eagle Ford Shale.

Published on October 29, 2011

Houston-based Troy Construction started laying pipelines for the oil shale industry three months ago. It employs about 400 employees in Yorktown. Troy superintendent Bernie Drane said most of the employees live outside the Crossroads. Finding accommodations for the influx of new workers is a continuing challenge for the town.

Published on October 29, 2011

The rise of the oil shale industry has created traffic and parking problems for Yorktown. While Main Street can get clogged with heavy trucks, the town has established "tow-away zones" to prevent them from parking in residential areas.

Published on October 29, 2011

As night falls, the Crossroads' new oil and gas boom becomes even more visible. This rig is along U.S. Highway 183 at the Hamon community near Gonzales. Drilling rigs tapping into the Eagle Ford Shale are going up across DeWitt and Gonzales counties and surrounding areas.

Published on September 24, 2011

Next to a mason jar full of the first oil pumped out of a well on the family's land in Moulton, Michelle Fojtik talks about what having a share in the Eagle Ford Shale means to her and her family. The Fotjiks usually keep the crude oil on their kitchen counter.

Published on September 24, 2011

The Fojtiks' dog, Sadie, lies beside the Gonzo North Well as the sun sets in Moulton. While her owners were making trips to watch the fracking of the area, Sadie made friends with the oil workers, who gave her extra scraps of food.

Published on September 24, 2011

The Gonzo-Hunter No. 1 pumps along on Carlotta Fairchild's property in Moulton. The pump became operational in March 2010.

Published on September 24, 2011

Carlotta Fairchild, left, Michelle Fojtik and Lorrie Janecek sit on the Fojtiks' porch in Moulton and talk about their experiences owning a share of an oil well on the Eagle Ford Shale.

Published on September 24, 2011

Julie Fojtik, 12, and her father, Dale Fojtik, look at a jar of oil pumped from the Gonzo- Hunter Well that they keep on their kitchen counter at their home in Moulton. Fojtik joked that it was so pure you could almost put it straight into your car.

Published on September 24, 2011

Drilling in the Eagle Ford Shale is bringing money and business to the small town of Moulton, where this oil rig looms large.

Published on September 24, 2011

Cory Power installs cases for electrical outlets during construction for a BJ Davis Home in the Lake Forest subdivision on Friday. The subdivision is experiencing a growth due to economic advancements brought on by Caterpillar and Eagle Ford Shale.

Published on September 20, 2011

A close-up of a BJ Davis Homes billboard at an entrance to the Lake Forest subdivision shows that the majority of the lots on that section are sold. The area is under expansion as the economic impact of Caterpillar and Eagle Ford Shale is trickling down into the home building industry. Lake Forest is seeing its biggest advancement since it first opened.

Published on September 20, 2011

Tony Perez installs a waterproof seal joint as he and other workers construct a street for a future eight-home cul-de-sac in the Lake Forest subdivision. Developers such as Bill Davis, who owns BJ Davis Homes, are beginning to construct more homes because of a demand, which is partly the result of other economic advancements brought on by Caterpillar and Eagle Ford Shale.

Published on September 20, 2011